China
 

Green tea is the ordinary beverage of the Chinese. In China, the various teas differ in growing method, manufacturing process and the shape given to the leaf.
The Tea Route brings you the most famous Chinese teas from small producers

 

All the different varieties of tea are grown in China. The Chinese claim that it would take more than a single lifetime to discover and sample all the varieties of tea grown there, and even they don't know for sure how many great tea gardens there are in the country that are known only to the initiated, who call them sacred gardens. What is certain is that there are more than a thousand different varieties.

 

In China, tea continues to be harvested and processed according to traditional methods, unchanged since the days of the great emperors.

 

In China, the various teas differ in growing method, manufacturing process and the shape given to the leaf.

 

The Tea Route offers tea connoisseurs some of the finest, most famous and rarest Chinese teas imported directly from small-scale producers we have selected during our travels. This enables us to offer you very good prices but please note that due to limited quantities we can not guarantee continuous availability.

Tai Ping Hou Kui

Ti Kuan Yin

Long Jing

 

Green tea, which they drink all day long, is the ordinary beverage of the Chinese.

They usually throw a handfull of tea leaves in a thermos in the morning and keep filling it up with hot water throughout the day.

Besides the Gong Fu Cha, another traditional method of preparing tea uses a  zhong (also called gaiwan). This consists of a bowl, a lid and a saucer.

1. The zhong is flled with tea to 1/4 or 1/3 depending on leaf volume.

2. The tea leaves are rinsed with hot water which is immediatly discarded. This allows them to begin unfurling.

3. Fresh hot water is added and let to steep for 15 to 20 seconds.

4. Subsequent infusions follow, up to 10 or even 15 in the case of exceptional Oolong teas.

The lid serves to stir the leaves in the bowl and then block them while drinking.

The ideal zhong should be of white porcelain in order to bring out the colour of the infusion.